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Download go1.1.1.src.tar.gz and explore the features of Go


How to Download go1.1.1.src.tar.gz




Go is an open source programming language that makes it easy to build simple, reliable, and efficient software. Go is also known as Golang, and it was created by Google in 2007.


go1.1.1.src.tar.gz is a source code archive of Go version 1.1.1, which was released in June 2013. You might want to download this file if you want to install Go from source on your system, or if you want to explore the source code of Go.




download go1.1.1.src.tar.gz


Download File: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Ft.co%2FaPl4aOwEq6&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw0Cpg_oTRTJ0nTQajw1IL14



In this article, you will learn how to download go1.1.1.src.tar.gz, extract it, and install Go from source on your system.


Before you start, you need to have some prerequisites:


  • A Unix-like operating system (such as Linux, macOS, or FreeBSD)



  • A C compiler (such as gcc or clang)



  • A Git client (optional, but recommended)



  • A working internet connection



Downloading go1.1.1.src.tar.gz




To download go1.1.1.src.tar.gz, you need to find the download link for it on the official Go website.


The easiest way to do this is to visit , which lists all the available binary and source distributions of Go.


Scroll down until you find the section for Source, and look for go1.1.1.src.tar.gz in the table.


You will see a link for downloading the file, as well as its size and SHA256 checksum.


How to download and install go1.1.1.src.tar.gz on Linux


go1.1.1.src.tar.gz source code download link


go1.1.1.src.tar.gz checksum and verification


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The checksum is a string of hexadecimal digits that represents a unique fingerprint of the file. You can use it to verify that the file you downloaded is not corrupted or tampered with.


To download the file, you can either click on the link or use a command-line tool like wget or curl.


For example, using wget:


$ wget


Or using curl:


$ curl -O


This will save the file in your current directory.


Verifying the checksum of the downloaded file




After downloading the file, you should verify its checksum to make sure it matches the one on the website.


To do this, you can use a command-line tool like sha256sum or shasum.


For example, using sha256sum:


$ sha256sum go1.11.src.tar.gz


Or using shasum:


$ shasum -a 256 go1.11.src.tar.gz


This will print out the checksum of the file.


Compare it with the one on the website, and make sure they are identical.


If they are not, it means that something went wrong during the download process, and you should try downloading the file again.


Extracting go1.11.src.tar.gz




After verifying the checksum of the file, you can proceed to extract it.


permission. For example, you can use /usr/local/go or /home/yourname/go.


You can also create a new directory for Go if you want.


Once you have decided on a location, you can extract the file using the tar command.


For example, if you want to extract the file to /usr/local/go, you can use:


$ sudo tar -C /usr/local/go -xzf go1.11.src.tar.gz


This will create a directory called go inside /usr/local/go, which contains the source code of Go.


If you don't have sudo access, you can use another location that you have write permission to, such as /home/yourname/go.


For example:


$ tar -C /home/yourname/go -xzf go1.11.src.tar.gz


Installing Go from source




After extracting the file, you can install Go from source on your system.


This involves setting up some environment variables, running a script, and testing the installation.


Setting up the environment variables for Go




You need to set up some environment variables for Go to work properly on your system.


The most important one is GOPATH, which specifies the location of your Go workspace, where you store your Go projects and packages.


You can choose any directory for your GOPATH, but it should be different from the directory where you extracted Go.


For example, you can use /home/yourname/gopath or /usr/local/gopath.


You can also create a new directory for your GOPATH if you want.


Once you have decided on a GOPATH, you need to export it as an environment variable.


You can do this by adding a line to your shell profile file, such as /.bashrc or /.zshrc.


For example:


export GOPATH=/home/yourname/gopath


You also need to add the bin directory of your GOPATH to your PATH environment variable, so that you can run the Go tools and programs from anywhere on your system.


You can do this by adding another line to your shell profile file:


export PATH=$PATH:$GOPATH/bin


Another environment variable that you might want to set up is GOROOT, which specifies the location of your Go installation.


This is usually not necessary, as Go can figure out its own root directory from the path of the go command.


However, if you want to be explicit, or if you have multiple versions of Go installed on your system, you can set GOROOT to the directory where you extracted Go.


For example:


export GOROOT=/usr/local/go


You also need to add the bin directory of your GOROOT to your PATH environment variable, so that you can run the go command from anywhere on your system.


You can do this by adding another line to your shell profile file:


export PATH=$PATH:$GOROOT/bin


After setting up these environment variables, you need to source your shell profile file or open a new terminal session for them to take effect.


Running the installation script




To install Go from source, you need to run a script called all.bash, which is located in the src directory of your GOROOT.


This script will compile and install Go on your system, as well as run some tests and benchmarks to check if everything is working correctly.


To run the script, you need to change your current directory to the src directory of your GOROOT, and then execute it with bash.


For example:


$ cd $GOROOT/src


$ bash all.bash


This will take some time, depending on the speed of your system and internet connection.


You will see some output on the screen, showing the progress of the installation and testing process.


If everything goes well, you will see a message like this at the end:


ALL TESTS PASSED


Testing the installation




To test if Go is installed correctly on your system, you can try running some simple commands with the go tool.


The go tool is a command-line interface that lets you perform various tasks related to Go programming, such as building, testing, running, formatting, and installing Go code.


use the go tool, you need to type go followed by a subcommand and some arguments.


For example, to check the version of Go ins


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